Houses and Heroes: the Masters of the Country House Within Novels

£75.00

What exactly does it mean to be ‘The Master’ of a country house within a novel: how has this shaped some of literature’s greatest heroes and villains?

Come and discuss money, marriage, masculinity and the odd murder.

Novels to include: Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda, Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, Nancy Mitford’s Love in a Cold Climate, Sarah Waters’s The Little Stranger

Description

Description

What exactly does it mean to be ‘The Master of the House’? It is a phrase that suggests enormous power: of which the country house itself appears to be the ultimate proof. But how much power do these men actually have? What exactly is their relationship to their houses and to the mistress of the house?

Becoming  the master of a country house has impacted massively on some of literature’s great heroes and villains (and sometimes it is very difficult to tell the difference!); it makes a murderer of Maxim de Winter, even as it helps to humanise Fitzwilliam Darcy. While novels often seem to suggest that securing husband with a country house is the ultimate success for a heroine, they also show that being the master of the house is a role that comes with a heavy cost.

Come and discuss money, marriage, masculinity and the odd murder.

Novels to include: Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda, Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, Nancy Mitford’s Love in a Cold Climate, Sarah Waters’s The Little Stranger